Tuesday, August 11, 2009

Foillard.

I was feeling really down tonight, and in the time-honored tradition of men the world over, I turned to drink. I went down to the cellar for a bottle of champagne, of course—what else would it be? Yet after rummaging around in the damp, cobwebby depths, I surprised even myself by emerging not with champagne, but with a bottle of Foillard Morgon, Corcelette 2006.

It was delicious, showing you its velvety, black cherry fruit while simultaneously throwing an elbow of flinty, granitic f**k-you-ness. Old vines, little sulfur, no fining, no filtration, all true.

Yes, I drank the whole bottle. No, everything is still not right with the world. But as far as anesthesia goes, I appreciate the Foillards being here on this planet and giving us the things that they do.

8 comments:

Brooklynguy said...

hi peter - are the vines from Côte du Py, or are these vines from other areas in Morgon? good for you for drinking the whole bottle. i'm kind of surprised that you didn't open another one.

spume said...

Sometimes a little granitic f**k-you-ness is just what the doctor ordered. At least for a little while...

Samantha Dugan said...

Peter,
F**k-you-ness is an awesome descriptor...plan on using that if you don't mind. Feeling you on the being really down, I'm in the same spot...girls turn to drink as well. I will raise one of my too many glasses to you this evening, in the hopes of brighter days.

Anonymous said...

Superb post, superb wine, and a very well-received sentiment. Am thinking of going the Vouvray route, but one of _my_ too many glasses this evening will be raised to you, and to Morgon.

Regards,

jb

edelzwicker said...

The world is a sponge.
- Vic Chesnutt

Peter Liem said...

Thanks, guys. Brooklynguy, Corcelette is a vineyard with sandy topsoils, whereas the Cote du Py is more pure schist and granite. Agnès Foillard describes it as floral and violet-like, as opposed to the richer Cote du Py.

Brooklynguy said...

Thanks, i wonder, is Courcelette less suited for aging then? I have some 07s that seemed rather wound up to me, and I was thinking of giving them 5 years or so. Perhaps I shouldn't wait that long.

(squand)

Peter Liem said...

I don't see a problem with holding on to them for five years. The Foillards themselves say that both Cote du Py and Corcelette can be held for ten years, and the regular cuvée 2-5 years.