Monday, May 26, 2008

Finding Paradise at Vinobile

I was honored to be profiled a few weeks ago on Tom Wark’s excellent blog, Fermentation. One of the questions he asked me was, “What is Heaven like?” Not having actually been there until today, I didn’t really know at the time.

But here at Vinobile in Jerez, I’ve found something deliciously close to paradise. The whole point of the show is that many of the greatest sweet wines from all over the world are available to taste, but even more compelling for me is that there’s an entire room completely devoted to sherry. It’s divided up by style, and just about everything you can possibly think of is being poured, from La Gitana Manzanilla to Tradicion Oloroso to Barbadillo Amontillado Reliquia. I must have tasted around 25 finos and 20 manzanillas this morning, before settling in to an equally grand tasting this afternoon of amontillado, palo cortado and oloroso VOS and VORS. Tomorrow I’m going back for more oloroso and old amontillado and palo cortado. If you’re a fan of sherry, it’s difficult to imagine a tasting any better than this.

2 comments:

Scott McCulloch said...

Peter,
I just discovered your blog a couple of weeks ago, thanks to Eric Asimov’s piece over at The Pour. I am not a regular Champagne drinker, because of financial considerations, but have enjoyed reading all of your previous posts. I am living in Kochi, Japan, which is in the heart of katsuo (skipjack tuna) country, so I especially appreciated your posts from Japan. My wife just gave birth to a son this morning. His name is Toma (“winter horse”--although the Chinese characters are not yet definitely set). I am thinking of getting a couple of bottles of champagne for him when I visit my hometown of Seattle this summer. Something that might be drinking well twenty years from now, when he is more likely to be interested in such things. Any ideas?

Thanks,
Scott McCulloch

Peter Liem said...

Hello Scott,

Congratulations on your new baby! Hope that both mother and son are doing well. I envy you living in Japan -- the katsuo that you must see! Seattle is, fortunately, one of the finest places in the US to buy champagne, largely thanks to the efforts of wholesaler and importer Triage Wines. You can certainly buy champagne that will last for twenty years (I daresay that actually, most champagnes that you buy, especially vintage ones, will easily last that long if stored impeccably), but I'm imagining that what you might really want is a vintage 2008 champagne. Since it hasn't been harvested yet (and who knows if 2008 will be a vintage-quality year, although we're crossing our fingers), you obviously need to wait a little while for that (another four to eight years for growers, maybe five to 12 years for houses). I'll certainly have more to say about the 2008 vintage over the next year as it develops, and I'm sure other people will too.