Monday, March 10, 2008

Breakfast and Borgogno (but not at the same time)

I was reminded this weekend of Dr. Vino’s recent post about breakfast wines, although in my case, breakfast was actually breakfast! Ramonet Bienvenue-Bâtard-Montrachet and Old Mill of Guilford grits. Outstanding. To be nitpicky, Ramonet Bienvenue isn’t so great with eggs. Some better choices for the eggs were a laser-like 1979 Lanson from magnum and a sappy, fragrant 1986 L’Espiegle Brut Rosé from R. Renaudin, also in magnum.

I have no reason to post this second photo other than that I love it: my friends shucking a fabulous spread of oysters on the back porch of the house, overlooking the Manzanita beach.


We finished the day with a small flight of Borgogno Barolo (after warming up with a complex, vigorous bottle of 1985 Marcarini Brunate and a richly meaty 1978 Produttori del Barbaresco Pora Riserva). The first legal document mentioning the Borgogno estate dates back to 1848, although Borgogno can trace its history as far back as 1761, when it was founded by Bartolomeo Borgogno. Known as a producer of traditionally-styled wines of great longevity, Borgogno periodically re-releases older vintages onto the market, and it’s possible to find great old vintages even today. The bottles that we drank were all from a European cellar and sported red capsules, indicating that they were from original releases (the re-released vintages now have a black capsule).


A 1964 was velvety in texture and sweetly primary, with firm structure and fragrant length, while the 1957 (hardly a vintage of great renown) showed a surprisingly voluptuous fragrance and tarry perfume. The 1952 was absolutely outstanding, with energetic, multi-dimensional flavors of porcini, sweet cherry, tar and dry spice. It was even sexier on the nose than the 1947, in a flirtatious, come-hither sort of way, but the latter wine was clearly the more complete and complex, with its deeply fragrant aromas and rich, mouthfilling presence. The astounding finish was reminiscent of a great La Tâche—long, complex, expansive and intricately detailed.

1 comment:

Mike said...

That picture (oysters, seashore and goldens) makes me smile. Just perfect....